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Is Google paying 3% tax?

The debate is over what counts as Google's "economic activity" in the UK.

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British influence in the EU Council of Ministers

The UK's formal voting weight in the important EU Council of Ministers has declined since we joined, but recent changes push it back up to 13%.

Four million people have diabetes—probably

New figures claiming that four million people have diabetes seem right, although the estimate for the half a million who are undiagnosed is hard to verify.

Rail fares: up 25% in six years?

Have rail fares gone up by a quarter since 2010, as the Labour Party claims?

Home ownership: the lowest in a generation?

Labour claims that home ownership is at its lowest level in a generation. The proportion of English households owning their home is the lowest since 1984.

We don't know that 100,000 illegal migrants have been stopped at the border

The claim that 100,000 illegal migrants have been stopped at the border is an unofficial projection and is uncertain.

Ask Full Fact: is poverty being redefined to remove any reference to income?

New measures going through Parliament replace existing income indicators of child poverty with ones that focus on worklessness and educational attainment.

Have A&E admissions for alcohol poisoning doubled?

Headlines refer to A&E admissions when the statistics they're using measure people visiting A&E, regardless of what kind of treatment they get.

Social care funding: how did the sector react to the latest plans?

David Cameron and Jeremy Corbyn swapped quotes from health and social care leaders during Prime Minister's Questions.

17 December's BBC Question Time, factchecked

We factchecked the panel's claims about migrants benefits, Norway's relationship with the EU and trade.

Is the EU referendum outcome "on a knife edge"?

Online polls conducted this week show preferences for the EU referendum vote are neck and neck while telephone polls have found a strong lead for 'remain'.

A new EU border agency, or an EU army?

Newspaper reports describe a proposed new European Border and Coast Agency as an EU "army" or "navy". We've taken a look.

Employment, hospital beds, and A&E: factchecking Prime Minister's Questions

We've factchecked claims from Prime Minister's Questions on employment, hospitals, A&E, and refugees.

Are more teachers quitting the profession than entering it?

Labour claims that record numbers of teachers are quitting the profession, and that more are leaving it than are entering it.

How much are charities spending on good works?

A new report criticises charities based on their spending on charitable activities as a proportion of their income. But this metric can be confusing.

"Hoverboards" and the law

It's been claimed that the prosecution service recently made "hoverboards" illegal. But it has no such power; newspapers have just picked up on an existing law.

Is immigration affecting the performance of native English speakers in schools?

It's been claimed that increasing numbers of pupils with English as an additional language is affecting the performance of their peers.

10 December's BBC Question Time, factchecked

We factchecked the panel's claims from BBC Question Time on Donald Trump, the European Arrest Warrant, Norway, shoot-to-kill, and mental health.

Would restricting in-work benefits to EU migrants reduce immigration?

Sir Stephen Nickell has said that restricting access to benefits wouldn't have much impact on EU immigration, Iain Duncan Smith says it would.

Claim that Islamic State hack brought down university internet services appears unfounded

A headline in the Express claimed that an Islamic State hack disrupted university internet services, but the evidence it gave for this is not convincing.

Trade with the EU, nurses, and tuition fees: factchecking Prime Minister's Questions

We've factchecked claims from Prime Minister's Questions on trade with the EU, nurses and tuition fees.

Flood defences: what's happening to funding?

Capital spending is set to be £1.9 billion this parliament, up from previous parliaments. But capital spending isn't the whole story.

Would early closure of the Renewables Obligation to onshore wind cost £100 million?

The government says closing the Renewables Obligation to onshore wind early will bring benefits of £160 million.

Air strikes: how many teachers and nurses could we pay for instead?

Would air strikes in Syria cost £508,000 each, enough to pay for about 20 teachers or 19 nurses?