Parents aren’t being urged to donate their children’s organs at vaccine appointments

8 November 2021
What was claimed

A sign at a vaccine clinic urges parents to donate their children’s organs.

Our verdict

This is not true, and the picture being shared has been manipulated to change the text on the sign, which originally read “Covid vaccines here” in Spanish.

An image of a sign at a Covid-19 vaccination clinic has been photoshopped to read as if it is urging parents to donate their children’s organs. 

It has been retweeted or quote tweeted more than 4,000 times after it was posted by musicians Right Said Fred and has also appeared on Facebook. Full Fact has been contacted directly by readers who have seen the image. 

The sign in the edited image says “don’t forget to donate your childrens [sic] organs” alongside a message saying “Covid Vaccines Here, NO Appointment Needed,” and the name of a group of hospitals in the US city of Boston

It has clearly been manipulated, as evidenced not only by the grammatical error, but also by the circulation of the original picture, which shows the text “Covid vaccines here” in Spanish and reiterates the message that no appointments are needed. 

A quick Google search reveals that the source of the picture is actually a pop-up vaccine clinic outside the Gillette Stadium, which is home to the American football team the New England Patriots. The page linked to the picture now appears to have been taken down, but an archived version describes how mobile vaccination clinics had been organised for events at the stadium. 

After being criticised online for sharing a manipulated image, Right Said Fred reposted it alongside the original picture and said one had been photoshopped—though they did not specify which image was which. 

The version of the post on Facebook is accompanied by a fabricated quote, supposedly from former US secretary of state Henry Kissinger, about mandatory vaccinations and the genetic modification and sterilisation of children. 

As we and other fact checkers have written, there is no evidence Mr Kissinger ever made these comments. 

This article is part of our work fact checking potentially false pictures, videos and stories on Facebook. You can read more about this—and find out how to report Facebook content—here. For the purposes of that scheme, we’ve rated this claim as false because the image of the poster has been photoshopped and all the evidence suggests the quote is a fabrication.

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